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Rau, Children

Puke Ariki

Two children, both seated. Girl wearing dress and boy wearing shirt and shorts. 'Swainson/Woods Collection, Puke Ariki and District Libraries'

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Rau, Group

Puke Ariki

Family group of five. Elderly man, young girl, infant boy and woman in front. Man at rear. 'Swainson/Woods Collection, Puke Ariki and District Libraries'

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He hui kei te Tairawhiti; te 5 ki 10 o Maehe, 1930. [Te Rau Press Ltd, Gisborne. Front page. 1930]

Alexander Turnbull Library

Front page of pamphlet in Maori about a meeting at Tairawhiti concerning a tennis group as part of the Roopu Tenihi Maori o Aotearoa. Quantity: 1 Album(s). Physical Description: Letter press on folded pamphlet 170 x 117 mm.

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Churchward, Joseph, 1933 - :Te Rau Aroha. Hui Aroha Rangatahi. Official programme, Wellington Diocesan Maori Youth Festival, 22nd - 24th October 1955. Host Pastorate - Wellington. [Front cover. 1955]

Alexander Turnbull Library

Programme booklet cover shows the shield of the Wellington Dicoese Maori Youth, and a frieze of carved Maori tiki faces at the top and lower edge of the cover, in red ink. Quantity: 1 booklet. Physical Description: Colour print on cover of booklet, 203 x 128 mm.

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Kereopa Te Rau

Alexander Turnbull Library

Carte de visite portrait of Kereopa Te Rau, Ngati Rangiwewehi warrior and Pai Marire leader, taken at Napier prison on 8 December 1871 by Samuel Carnell of Napier. Inscriptions: Inscribed - Photographer's title on negative -centre: S Carnell Photo 8/12/71. Kereopa Te Rau, who had long been sought by the colonial authorities for his part in the killing of the Reverend Carl Volkner, was captured in the Urewera country in November 1871 by Ngati Porou, under the command of Ropata Wahawaha.He was brought to Napier by steamer and handed over to the police on November 28. As he was taken over the threshhold of the prison he slashed his throat with a concealed razor, but prompt medical attention saved his life. This photograph was taken eight later, and the piupiu (flax skirt) around his shoulders conceals the scar of the razor wound. Kereopa was hanged on 5 January, 1872. Quantity: 1 b&w original negative(s). Physical Description: Wet collodion glass negative 4.25 x 3.25 inches

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Kereopa Te Rau

Alexander Turnbull Library

Portrait of Kereopa Te Rau taken on 8 December 1871, a few weeks before he was hanged on 5 January 1872. A piupiu is around his shoulders. Taken by Samuel Carnell. Inscriptions: Inscribed - Photographer's title on negative -S Carnell. Photo. 8/12/17 [sic]S Carnell. Photo. 8/12/71 [This is in faint mirror writing overlapping the other inscription]. Quantity: 1 b&w original negative(s). Physical Description: Wet collodion glass negative 4.25 x 3.25 inches

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Tarāwhai Tāngata Rau

University of Waikato

Ngāti Tarāwhai are a unique tribal group from the Te Arawa confederation of tribes. Located around their traditional stronghold of Lake Okataina, Tarāwhai have endured throughout history to become a proud and noble clan, maintaining their culture and distinctive tribal practises. Part of their survival throughout time has been their ability to rely on particular traits and attributes that have been portrayed and maintained by members of Tarāwhai across the generations. These special characteristics have not only supported the development of Tarāwhai, but have also helped the evolution of Tarāwhai’s identity. This thesis is concerned with four aspects that have been identified as common traits throughout Ngāti Tarāwhai history. In particular, this study will look at the roles of leaders, tohunga, warriors and carving experts and explore how these qualities have featured significantly within Tarāwhai’s history for many generations. Furthermore, this thesis will discuss how these aspects have influenced the development of the tribe from early time through to the present day. It is the proposition of this thesis that the above mentioned attributes have shaped the people of Tarāwhai into the tribal group that they are today. In addition, while Māori society has changed dramatically in the last 100 years, Tarāwhai continue to display these characteristics in a modern world, and they are still central to the reaffirmation of Tarāwhai identity and the overall wellbeing of the people. Finally this thesis believes that these attributes must be maintained and perpetuated for Tarāwhi to have a secure place in the future.

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Te Rau Ko Kore. Ki Rau Ko Kore

Auckland War Memorial Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira

Painting/Drawing, Pencil, ink and watercolour; The first two works in this sketchbook attributed to Merrett, and the last to Cuthbert C. Clarke, the rest are by Heaphy. The Three of the Heaphy sketchbooks, PD 56(85-87), were dismantled from their original sketchbook format and the works were individually mounted, using conservation materials. The original covers and bindings are boxed separately.; Figure studies, of 6 Maori sitting wrapped in cloaks or blankets. The skin of the figures has been tinted with ink or watercolour.

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Ko taku rau kotahi

University of Otago

Raupatu (conquest of land) has been and still is a threat to the sovereignty and self-management of the Māori people. For the people of Waikato, raupatu has had such a significant impact that it has become a part of the people’s identity. The New Zealand Land Wars of the 1860s signalled the beginning of the troubles for Waikato that would plague them for generations. Many Waikato people died for the land that had once nourished them, which was ‘stolen’ by the Crown and its colonial forces under the guise of ‘confiscation’ by way of the New Zealand Settlement Act 1863. This thesis examines raupatu in relation to the Waikato people, and the effects raupatu has had on them. This thesis also illustrates the connection between the Waikato people and whenua tupu (ancestral lands) through countless generations of people who committed their lives to the struggle to have their lands returned as proclaimed in the decree ‘i haere whenua atu, me hoki whenua mai.’ This decree is examined in relationship to the Deed of Settlement 1995 whereby the Crown addressed the grievances of the Waikato people and some hope was once again instilled within the people.

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Post Office Savings Bank (N.Z.) :The art of Maori recreation. With the compliments of the Post Office Savings Bank [ca 1976]

Alexander Turnbull Library

Poster in pink and purple print on white, shows kite flying (manu tukutuku), draughts (mu torere), knuckle bones (koruru), spinning top (potaka), stilt walking, sledges, stick games (ti rakau), jumping jack (karetao), leaf boat (waka rau), darts (niti teka), string games, roundabout (moari). Quantity: 1 colour photo-mechanical print(s). Physical Description: Offset print, 775 x 545 mm. Provenance: Acquired in 1976.

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Maungakiekie (One Tree Hill), Tāmaki-makau-rau

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Maungakiekie (One Tree Hill) was an extensive pā, protected by excavated terraces with a number of areas reserved for kūmara gardens. The volcanic soil of Auckland was particularly well suited to Māori agriculture.

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Maungakiekie (One Tree Hill), Tāmaki-makau-rau

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Because so many tribes have lived in the area, there are at least six different explanations for the origin of Auckland’s Māori name, Tāmaki. One view is that the name derives from the 18th-century Te Wai-o-Hua chief Kiwi Tāmaki, whose pā was at ...

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Te Rau Puawai 2002-2004: An evaluation

University of Waikato

Established in 1999 as a joint workforce initiative between the former Health Funding Authority and Massey University, Te Rau Puawai aimed to support 100 Maori students to graduate with mental health qualifications within a five year period. The goal of Te Rau Puawai is to contribute to the building of capacity for Maori in the mental health workforce. The programme exceeded its performance expectations in the first two years (1999-2001) with 56 bursars completing their qualifications. Bursars achieved an 80% pass rate compared with 65% for all students at Massey University as a whole. In 2004, this pass rate has continued, a significant achievement in light of increasing numbers of bursars being accepted and many without previously studying at the tertiary level. In 2001 the Maori & Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) at the University of Waikato undertook an evaluation of Te Rau Puawai reporting on the programme's success and identifying any barriers the programme needed to address. The 2002 evaluation report outlines critical success factors and recommendations for improvement. In 2003 Te Rau Puawai negotiated further funding from the Mental Health Directorate (MeHD) of the Ministry of Health under the Mental Health Workforce Development Strategy (2002). Workforce development is critical in building capacity and capability in the mental health workforce to increase appropriately skilled workers required to meet the mental health needs of Maori communities. In 2004 the Ministry of Health requested a follow-up evaluation to provide a descriptive record of programme activities and progress from April 2002 to December 2004. This report provides an overview of Te Rau Puawai activities between 2002 and 2004; the progress and contributions made by bursars to the mental health workforce; and a reassessment of the programme's critical success factors.

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Te-Rau-Tau-Hoou, Ngutuwera pā, Waitotara

Puke Ariki

Shows the front door of the old dining hall, Te-Rau-Tau-Hoou, at Ngutuwera pā, Waitotara. There is an inscription above the door which reads "1913 Te-Rau-Tau-Hoou".

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Te-Rau-Tau-Hoou, Ngutuwera pā, Waitotara

Puke Ariki

Shows the old dining hall, Te-Rau-Tau-Hoou, at Ngutuwera pā, Waitotara.

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Te Rau Aroha Maori Club Murupara - (Te Ao Hou - No. 51 June 1965)

Alexander Turnbull Library

This recently formed club is concerned with Maori culture and also with a number of sports activities, including basketball, tennis, men's hockey and rugby. Many of the members come from districts such as Gisborne, Ruatoria, Whakatane and Rotorua. There are several active Pakeha members. President: Mr John Grace (Ruatoria). Vice-Presidents: Mr Jame...

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Te Rau o Te Aroha Maori Battalion Hall, Palmerston North

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This building, designed by John Scott and opened in 1964, blends Māori and Pākehā design elements. Adelaide Poananga, a 20th-century leader of Rangitāne, was one of those who pushed for the construction of this landmark building.

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VI—Te Whanautanga O Hine-Rau-Wharangi - Maori Religion and Mythology Part 1

Victoria University of Wellington

Ka whanau a Hine-rau-wharangi i te Aonui o te Orongonui o te tau; ka kawea te whaea ki roto i Hui-te-ananui noho ai, me tona tama-hine. No te whakatarepatanga i te iho o tona tamahine kahurangi, ka whakaputaia mai ki waho o te whare, ki te roro o taua whare, ki runga i nga takapau wharanui raua ko tona whaea noho ai. Ka whakatata atu te maru iwi...

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Te Whetu-mata-rau, 1820–21 - Maori Wars of the Nineteenth Century:

Victoria University of Wellington

The following particulars were told me by Te Hati-te-Hou-ka-mau and others in 1899:— Te Wera’s first expedition returned to the Bay of Islands in April, 1821, having been absent for sixteen months, so it would probably be in the middle of 1820 that they arrived off page 168 Te Kawakawa Bay. As the Nga-Puhi fleet approached, there was much conste...

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Chapter VI — At Te Rau College - The Autobiography of a Maori

Victoria University of Wellington

When I left Canterbury College, before completing my B.A. degree, I was appointed assistant tutor at Te Rau Theological College. The principal was the Venerable Archdeacon H. W. Williams who was later appointed Bishop of Waiapu. I found that when I taught, the Archdeacon knocked off for the day, yet there was ample work for both of us. I also c...

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